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    Making sure the elderly get the services they need

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    Helping people maximise their income

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    Breaking the link between poor health and poverty

Statistics

Child poverty

The indicator previously recorded as ‘relative child poverty’ is now referred to as ‘children in low-income families’. This change occurred in the 2010 dataset, published in 2013. This measure shows the proportion of children living in families in receipt of out-of-work benefits or in receipt of tax credits where their reported income is less than 60% of the UK median income.

In 2011, there were 4,490 children in Lincoln living in low-income families, accounting for 23.8% of children. When just under 16s were looked at, the rate increased marginally to 24.7% (3,995 children).

Of the children living in low-income households in Lincoln:

• 68.5% lived in lone parent families
• 35.0% were aged 0-4
• 31.2% were aged 5-10
• 22.8% were aged 11-15
• 11.0% were aged 16-19 .

The highest concentration was in Birchwood, where one third of children were from low-income households, followed by Glebe where 30% of children were. Rates were also high in Abbey, Moorland and Park. In total, there were an estimated 2,980 children living in low-income households in these areas.

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Source: HMRC (2013)
With a rate of 23.8%, Lincoln had the second highest proportion of children living in low-income households amongst our nearest neighbours.

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Source: HMRC (2013)

Income deprivation affecting children

There were three areas in Lincoln that featured within the most 5% of deprived areas in England. These areas were western Birchwood (‘29’), Boultham Moor (‘73’) and an area of St. Giles (‘52’) .

Income Deprivation Affecting Children Index 2010

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Source: DCLG (2012)

 

Fuel poverty

The UK Government recently set out a new definition of fuel poverty called the ‘Low Income High Costs framework’. The information below was based on this definition. Because this was a new indicator, there was no historical trending available. Under the new definition, a household was said to be in fuel poverty if:

• They have required fuel costs that are above the average (national median level)

• Were they to spend that amount, they would be left with a residual income below the official poverty line

Lincoln (16.3%) had a higher proportion of households estimated to be in fuel poverty than in the East Midlands and England. In total, this accounted for 6,687 households out of the 41,106 households in the city .

Carholme, Abbey and Park had the highest numbers of households experiencing fuel poverty. This was followed by Castle, Minster and Boultham. An interesting point to note was that wards with high levels of fuel poverty did not always correlate with areas of high deprivation. For example, Birchwood, Moorland and Glebe all contained pockets of high deprivation, but were relatively low in terms of fuel poverty.

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Source: DECC (2013)

With a rate of 16.3%, Lincoln had the highest fuel poverty rate amongst our nearest neighbours.

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Source: DECC (2013)

Income deprivation affecting older people

There were three areas in Lincoln that featured within the most 5% of deprived areas in England. These were an area of St. Giles (‘52’), Boultham Moor (‘73’) and an area to the north east of Boultham ward, close to the city centre (‘32’) .

Income Deprivation Affecting Older People Index 2010

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Source: DCLG (2012)